Why Architects Need Interior Designers

Why Architects Need Designers.png

I decided to write this blog post because I strongly believe that more Interior Designers need to work with Architects, and more Architects need to work with Interior Designers. 

This blog concept started when I began a new project of an existing penthouse suite and noticed that the Architecture in this unit was very abnormal. Once I began to place standard sized furniture into this floorplan, I noticed that the Architecture clearly had not been thought all the way through to the function of the space.    

1.  I circled this area because in a Master Bedroom such as this, you generally want the furniture centered on each wall. For instance in this room the King Bed is placed on the center of one wall, and the dresser, with a TV is mounted on the opposite wall. This wall seems like a load bearing wall, so it is structural and can not be moved, however, it should have been framed flush with the structural beam so that the wall was flat and the dresser could be place on center with the bed. After all, if you were watching TV in bed, you don't want your head to be turned the entire time, that would be uncomfortable.    2. This is a junction box which is where the dining room lighting was intended to be. But based on the shape of the room, and the location of the cable for the TV, the layout as you see it here is the only way this room will function with the furniture provided. So why is this junction box so far away from where the dining room table is placed? An Architect clearly should have at least asked a designer to place some furniture in the floor plan before building this unit so that these details would have been thought out more.   3. This is another structural column, and though there is not much you can do about this, if this client wanted drapery, there would not be enough space for the drapes to pass between the column and the windows, which would create a light gap, and no one wants that. The only solution here is to do a shade. And I would highly suggest a motorized shade so that the client doesn't have to reach around this column to control the shade.   4. Why so many doors? Why not just one door for the bathroom and one for the bedroom? And how ugly this must look from outside the building, to see a pocket door that doesn't line up with the mullions of the window. Who wants to see the edge of a door frame? No one. Unfortunately this is another example of this design not being thought all the way through from concept to functional completion.  5. This room is a secondary master (usually intended for vacation homes shared by more than 1 family or multi-generational families) and while this room is intended for two adults to stay in this space, the room is a little too small. As you can see the closet doors are running into the nightstand, making this door unusable. Although we could remove the nightstand all together, and the room might function better, it is best to have balance (and equality) in a room meant for two people. Most nightstands are 24"-30" wide, while these are only 20" wide, the space is already pretty tight. Nightstands are usually 24"-30" because they are designed to have a table lamp on top to provide task lighting (for those late nights with your laptop or book), and most table lamps have a base 8"-24" in diameter. Another solution could have been to move the bed to the opposite wall, however it is bad feng-shui to have to turn your head to see who is coming into the room. The cable is also on the wall where the dresser is currently located which would be costly to move the cable to the opposing wall. This is another example of a room that wasn't clearly thought out. It should have been a little larger to allow for all the needed furniture.  

1.  I circled this area because in a Master Bedroom such as this, you generally want the furniture centered on each wall. For instance in this room the King Bed is placed on the center of one wall, and the dresser, with a TV is mounted on the opposite wall. This wall seems like a load bearing wall, so it is structural and can not be moved, however, it should have been framed flush with the structural beam so that the wall was flat and the dresser could be place on center with the bed. After all, if you were watching TV in bed, you don't want your head to be turned the entire time, that would be uncomfortable.   

2. This is a junction box which is where the dining room lighting was intended to be. But based on the shape of the room, and the location of the cable for the TV, the layout as you see it here is the only way this room will function with the furniture provided. So why is this junction box so far away from where the dining room table is placed? An Architect clearly should have at least asked a designer to place some furniture in the floor plan before building this unit so that these details would have been thought out more.  

3. This is another structural column, and though there is not much you can do about this, if this client wanted drapery, there would not be enough space for the drapes to pass between the column and the windows, which would create a light gap, and no one wants that. The only solution here is to do a shade. And I would highly suggest a motorized shade so that the client doesn't have to reach around this column to control the shade.  

4. Why so many doors? Why not just one door for the bathroom and one for the bedroom? And how ugly this must look from outside the building, to see a pocket door that doesn't line up with the mullions of the window. Who wants to see the edge of a door frame? No one. Unfortunately this is another example of this design not being thought all the way through from concept to functional completion. 

5. This room is a secondary master (usually intended for vacation homes shared by more than 1 family or multi-generational families) and while this room is intended for two adults to stay in this space, the room is a little too small. As you can see the closet doors are running into the nightstand, making this door unusable. Although we could remove the nightstand all together, and the room might function better, it is best to have balance (and equality) in a room meant for two people. Most nightstands are 24"-30" wide, while these are only 20" wide, the space is already pretty tight. Nightstands are usually 24"-30" because they are designed to have a table lamp on top to provide task lighting (for those late nights with your laptop or book), and most table lamps have a base 8"-24" in diameter. Another solution could have been to move the bed to the opposite wall, however it is bad feng-shui to have to turn your head to see who is coming into the room. The cable is also on the wall where the dresser is currently located which would be costly to move the cable to the opposing wall. This is another example of a room that wasn't clearly thought out. It should have been a little larger to allow for all the needed furniture.  

It is because of errors like this that Interior Designers are so crucial when building new homes, or remodels. No one wants to be surprised when their furniture can not fit in the room. After all, most people live in their homes for about 10 years (on average) before moving to another location, and they usually bring their existing furniture with them into their new space. So to all those who are considering moving or buying a new home, measure your furniture and make sure it fits in your home prior to purchasing!    

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